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    Why Does the Media Forgive Black Females?

    Why does Remy Ma's violence get a free pass while Casey Affleck's career is left in tatters?

    affleckcasey-kLzB-621x414@LiveMint-e1488191766653.jpgLast Sunday, actor Casey Affleck ascended to the spotlight when he won the Best Actor OSCAR for his role in last year's film Manchester by the Sea. The film, which co-stars Michelle Williams and Kyle Chandler, follows a man who looks after his teenage nephew after the boy's fathers death, and has been routinely critically acclaimed, placing highly on a multitude of critics lists for the best movies of 2016. Affleck's performance especially has been lauded as a "magnificent [...] career-best" and a "haunting face of grief and anger the viewer will never forget".

    But Affleck's win has been a bittersweet one, with nary an article discussing his achievement without bringing up his "dark secret" - the sexual harassment charges that were laid against him in 2010. Most of these charges stem back to Amanda White, the producer of I'm Still Here, a Joaquin Phoenix mockumentary directed by Affleck whom she had at that point worked with for over ten years. Over the course of filming, White claimed that Affleck had ordered a crew member to show her his penis even after she objected; had referred to women as "cows"; and had asked "Isn't it about time you get pregnant?" when he learnt of her age. Most notably, she alleged that he had also attempted to manipulate her into sharing a hotel room with him; and when she objected, grabbed her threateningly and attempted to scare her into submission, before going on to send her abusive text messages from his room.

    As part of her producer duties, White also renegotiated an agreement with Magdalena Gorka, the films director of photography who had previously left the project due to a similiar pattern of harassment which she called "the most traumatizing of her career". Apparently, Gorka had to face Affleck jokingly suggesting that she have sex with the camera assistant; received a "daily barrage of [...] unwelcome advances by crew members" and was berated by the director to the extent that she quit the film, twice. When the cast and crew had flown to New York to film, Gorka stated that they had not been given hotel rooms and had instead been expected to stay at Phoenix and Affleck's apartment. Phoenix had offered her his bedroom to stay in while he slept in the living room; but when she awoke in the middle of the night, she found Affleck “curled up next to her in the bed wearing only his underwear and a T-shirt. He had his arm around her, was caressing her back, his face was within inches of hers and his breath reeked of alcohol.” When she ordered him out of bed, he tried to convince her to let him stay before leaving the room and slamming the door in a rage.

    On the other hand, Remy Ma has been praised and adulated in the press recently thanks to her aggressive diss track against fellow female rapper Nicki Minaj. The beef started after Minaj featured on two recent singles - Jason Derulo's 'Swalla' and Gucci Mane's 'Make Love' - rapping lines which Ma interpreted as being about her. “I’m the iPhone, you the Nokia/Everybody know you jealous, bitch it’s so clear./Oooohhh, oh you the qu-e-e-the queen of this here?/One platinum plaque, album flopped, bitch, where?" she rapped in the latter, allegedly referencing the fact that Ma had only platinum plaque for her Fat Joe collaboration 'All The Way Up'. Ma hit back with 'Shether', an explicit Minaj diss track in which she quite literally raps "Fuck Nicki Minaj" and "They told you your whole career I’d come home and kill you, right?"

    Ma's past is a lot more colourful than Affleck's, and culminates in the night of July 13th, 2007 when she turned herself into New York City police. According to police, Ma was with a group of people outside the Pizza Bar restaurant that day at around 4 a.m when a gunshot was fired at Makeeda Barnes-Joseph, a former friend who had been accused of stealing money from Ma. Barnes-Joseph, who was 23 at the time, took the shot in the torso and sat in her car seriously wounded as Ma rifled through her purse looking for the stolen money. When she couldn't find the money, Ma jumped into a getaway car and left Barnes-Joseph bleeding out in the front seat.

    In March, 2008 Ma was convicted of assault, illegal weapon possession and attempted coercion. She was also charged with witness intimidation and gang assault after ordering several of her male friends to attack a witness's boyfriend after finding that the witness was testifying against her. Barnes-Joseph underwent several surgeries, but still experiences numbness in both legs and digestive problems as a result of the damage Ma did to her.

    If we're to believe the worst, then what both Affleck and Ma did are disgusting and reprehensible. Affleck's alleged crime points to a wider trend of cyclical chauvinism in the Hollywood sphere in which women are still underrepresented, while Ma's actions point to a psyche which is cruel, heartless and money-hungry. And yet what's interesting is the media's responses to each artists respective wins this week. For her part, Remy (the woman accused of attempted murder) has been able to avoid any discussion of her past, with critics ignoring her crimes to applaud the "nastiest ever diss track", a rap that "spewed venom" and a "work of notable lyrical invention". On the other hand, Affleck (whose most heinous crime was allegedly grabbing a woman's arm) had his win deemed as "gross" and a "disappointment", while award presenter Brie Larson received praise for her "silent stance".

    Sadly, it's a trend that's represented not just in this situation but in countless others as well. While the white-fronted La La Land is accused of "whitewashing" it's narrative, which critics say shows a white man "saving" jazz music from the evil clasps of a black male who is attempting to destroy and commercialise it, the exclusively black Moonlight is praised for a character list which is comprised completely of drug dealers, drug addicts and physically abusive bullies. Outside of awards season, we see the same rhetoric being used against Taylor Swift, who is often criticised for what people see as an arbitrary contribution to feminism when she donates hundreds of thousands of dollars to Kesha's lawsuit attempts or Tweets support of women's rights protests; while Beyoncé is praised for stealing writing credits on an album about her cheating husband and imparting such pearls of wisdom such as "mothers are like trees", while failing to donate any money or attend any protests herself.

    While you could collect this sentiment into the narrative of "hardly done white man suffers while black female soars", I'd venture to say that this would be the easy way out. For as much as this media trend belittles white males, it also reflects an underestimation of black females which is common in the media. Remy Ma's attempted murder, arrest and subsequent release are hardly remarked upon because violence is expected of her as a black woman. And Affleck's are brought up time and time again because as a white man of privilege he is somehow expected to know better. These are characterisations which do no favours to either star, and which, if media outlets such as BuzzFeed and Huffington Post are truly attempting to strive for equality through their articles, need to be avoided.



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    2 hours ago, Baby V Alex said:

    Just as you defending Caitlyn this is a mess bye

    And just like then, you had nothing logical or intelligent to say so rightfully so excused yourself from the conversation. Bye sis!

    5ML7O.gif

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    11 hours ago, Countess said:

    And now back to these bitches @Woodcrest and @Baby V Alex who seem to have a lot to say about my press...

    YRpVE.gif

    tumblr_inline_odiyjlZebw1sr01wc_500.gif

    The thing that rubbed me the wrong way was your statements about this being a thing about race, whilst there may be some truth to it the whole thing seemed very negatively charged, a little pointed and very racially motivated. Your use of Moonlight and Beyonce as examples were unnecessary and completely unrelated to the argument. Why does Moonlight's decision to feature "drug dealers, drug addicts and physically abusive bullies" mean that it's less deserving of a win than some rehashed musical that brings nothing new to the discussion of art? Moonlight is raw, violent, explores untrod territory and a whole demographic of people rarely spoken about in the mainstream media. The reality of life is that not everyone is nice and sometimes it's sobering to see something from a new perspective, but why does that put it below a film about singing? I see straight through that agenda and I'm not falling for it at all.

    As for the Beyonce part about little support to social activism, one of the Ferguson protesters said that her and Jay have a special account where they bail out hundreds of protesters and have over the years helped significantly with supporting protests and such. I guess the reason we don't hear about it is because they're both notoriously private, especially with their private funds (as should everyone) and rarely use social media beyond Instagram. Both have however incorporated the idea of racial inequality into their music so I guess it's an argument of whether that's enough in this modern age. Has she ever been to a protest? Maybe not, but then again all Taylor did was take advantage of the recent protests by tweeting some empty praise. Why does gross opportunism make her some kind of feminist icon? Where was she when the US was being torn in two during the elections and a rampant psychopath and misogynist was taking over the country? Perhaps we wouldn't even be having these protests had she stood up and declared her political allegiance during the election and educated her country following on the dangers he was bringing. And her donation to Kesha was just a tacky PR move and a further example of her blatant opportunism. That donation only came when the media exposure to the case reached its peak. Where was her support during the other year long history of the case?

    In regards to the whole Casey v Remy argument, I think we have to look at the context of why they're being put on their respective pedestal. Remy is the first artist in a while to come at Nicki with such ferociousness and I think that made people realise that Nicki isn't this untouchable object we make her out to be which led to all the media hype. The same would probably happen if any artist of Remy's notoriety were to come at her with such a charged diss. And whilst Remy was found guilty of her crimes (committed 9 years ago)- which are disgusting and in my opinion do deserve further consideration from the media- she has served the time and paid for it. On the other side of the coin Casey Affleck's accusations are still ongoing and are very recent. However the fact is is that Affleck has yet to be convicted of his accusations, and it's unlikely that he ever will without solid evidence. Until he's convicted of his crimes he shouldn't be vilified by the media so I guess I do agree with you on that. I guess it's a similar situation to the whole Kesha v Dr Luke scenario, whilst I love Kesha a lot and wish the best for her it hit a point where I no longer felt I could take a side because the whole thing is so up in the air. It's a moral situation which I'm struggling with because whilst I wish I could hate Luke there still isn't a single piece of concrete evidence beyond some emails which we really don't know much about.

    This isn't an attack on you and you shouldn't view it as one, we should be encouraging discourse about social issues so it's interesting to hear your thoughts, but here are mine.

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    1 hour ago, Woodcrest said:

    tumblr_inline_odiyjlZebw1sr01wc_500.gif

    The thing that rubbed me the wrong way was your statements about this being a thing about race, whilst there may be some truth to it the whole thing seemed very negatively charged, a little pointed and very racially motivated. Your use of Moonlight and Beyonce as examples were unnecessary and completely unrelated to the argument. Why does Moonlight's decision to feature "drug dealers, drug addicts and physically abusive bullies" mean that it's less deserving of a win than some rehashed musical that brings nothing new to the discussion of art? Moonlight is raw, violent, explores untrod territory and a whole demographic of people rarely spoken about in the mainstream media. The reality of life is that not everyone is nice and sometimes it's sobering to see something from a new perspective, but why does that put it below a film about singing? I see straight through that agenda and I'm not falling for it at all.

    As for the Beyonce part about little support to social activism, one of the Ferguson protesters said that her and Jay have a special account where they bail out hundreds of protesters and have over the years helped significantly with supporting protests and such. I guess the reason we don't hear about it is because they're both notoriously private, especially with their private funds (as should everyone) and rarely use social media beyond Instagram. Both have however incorporated the idea of racial inequality into their music so I guess it's an argument of whether that's enough in this modern age. Has she ever been to a protest? Maybe not, but then again all Taylor did was take advantage of the recent protests by tweeting some empty praise. Why does gross opportunism make her some kind of feminist icon? Where was she when the US was being torn in two during the elections and a rampant psychopath and misogynist was taking over the country? Perhaps we wouldn't even be having these protests had she stood up and declared her political allegiance during the election and educated her country following on the dangers he was bringing. And her donation to Kesha was just a tacky PR move and a further example of her blatant opportunism. That donation only came when the media exposure to the case reached its peak. Where was her support during the other year long history of the case?

    In regards to the whole Casey v Remy argument, I think we have to look at the context of why they're being put on their respective pedestal. Remy is the first artist in a while to come at Nicki with such ferociousness and I think that made people realise that Nicki isn't this untouchable object we make her out to be which led to all the media hype. The same would probably happen if any artist of Remy's notoriety were to come at her with such a charged diss. And whilst Remy was found guilty of her crimes (committed 9 years ago)- which are disgusting and in my opinion do deserve further consideration from the media- she has served the time and paid for it. On the other side of the coin Casey Affleck's accusations are still ongoing and are very recent. However the fact is is that Affleck has yet to be convicted of his accusations, and it's unlikely that he ever will without solid evidence. Until he's convicted of his crimes he shouldn't be vilified by the media so I guess I do agree with you on that. I guess it's a similar situation to the whole Kesha v Dr Luke scenario, whilst I love Kesha a lot and wish the best for her it hit a point where I no longer felt I could take a side because the whole thing is so up in the air. It's a moral situation which I'm struggling with because whilst I wish I could hate Luke there still isn't a single piece of concrete evidence beyond some emails which we really don't know much about.

    This isn't an attack on you and you shouldn't view it as one, we should be encouraging discourse about social issues so it's interesting to hear your thoughts, but here are mine.

    End. Her.

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    8 hours ago, Woodcrest said:

    tumblr_inline_odiyjlZebw1sr01wc_500.gif

    The thing that rubbed me the wrong way was your statements about this being a thing about race, whilst there may be some truth to it the whole thing seemed very negatively charged, a little pointed and very racially motivated. Your use of Moonlight and Beyonce as examples were unnecessary and completely unrelated to the argument. Why does Moonlight's decision to feature "drug dealers, drug addicts and physically abusive bullies" mean that it's less deserving of a win than some rehashed musical that brings nothing new to the discussion of art? Moonlight is raw, violent, explores untrod territory and a whole demographic of people rarely spoken about in the mainstream media. The reality of life is that not everyone is nice and sometimes it's sobering to see something from a new perspective, but why does that put it below a film about singing? I see straight through that agenda and I'm not falling for it at all.

    As for the Beyonce part about little support to social activism, one of the Ferguson protesters said that her and Jay have a special account where they bail out hundreds of protesters and have over the years helped significantly with supporting protests and such. I guess the reason we don't hear about it is because they're both notoriously private, especially with their private funds (as should everyone) and rarely use social media beyond Instagram. Both have however incorporated the idea of racial inequality into their music so I guess it's an argument of whether that's enough in this modern age. Has she ever been to a protest? Maybe not, but then again all Taylor did was take advantage of the recent protests by tweeting some empty praise. Why does gross opportunism make her some kind of feminist icon? Where was she when the US was being torn in two during the elections and a rampant psychopath and misogynist was taking over the country? Perhaps we wouldn't even be having these protests had she stood up and declared her political allegiance during the election and educated her country following on the dangers he was bringing. And her donation to Kesha was just a tacky PR move and a further example of her blatant opportunism. That donation only came when the media exposure to the case reached its peak. Where was her support during the other year long history of the case?

    In regards to the whole Casey v Remy argument, I think we have to look at the context of why they're being put on their respective pedestal. Remy is the first artist in a while to come at Nicki with such ferociousness and I think that made people realise that Nicki isn't this untouchable object we make her out to be which led to all the media hype. The same would probably happen if any artist of Remy's notoriety were to come at her with such a charged diss. And whilst Remy was found guilty of her crimes (committed 9 years ago)- which are disgusting and in my opinion do deserve further consideration from the media- she has served the time and paid for it. On the other side of the coin Casey Affleck's accusations are still ongoing and are very recent. However the fact is is that Affleck has yet to be convicted of his accusations, and it's unlikely that he ever will without solid evidence. Until he's convicted of his crimes he shouldn't be vilified by the media so I guess I do agree with you on that. I guess it's a similar situation to the whole Kesha v Dr Luke scenario, whilst I love Kesha a lot and wish the best for her it hit a point where I no longer felt I could take a side because the whole thing is so up in the air. It's a moral situation which I'm struggling with because whilst I wish I could hate Luke there still isn't a single piece of concrete evidence beyond some emails which we really don't know much about.

    This isn't an attack on you and you shouldn't view it as one, we should be encouraging discourse about social issues so it's interesting to hear your thoughts, but here are mine.

    So who's gonna run PHF and the 5 of us since Mo is dead after this?

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    14 hours ago, Woodcrest said:

    tumblr_inline_odiyjlZebw1sr01wc_500.gif

    The thing that rubbed me the wrong way was your statements about this being a thing about race, whilst there may be some truth to it the whole thing seemed very negatively charged, a little pointed and very racially motivated. Your use of Moonlight and Beyonce as examples were unnecessary and completely unrelated to the argument. Why does Moonlight's decision to feature "drug dealers, drug addicts and physically abusive bullies" mean that it's less deserving of a win than some rehashed musical that brings nothing new to the discussion of art? Moonlight is raw, violent, explores untrod territory and a whole demographic of people rarely spoken about in the mainstream media. The reality of life is that not everyone is nice and sometimes it's sobering to see something from a new perspective, but why does that put it below a film about singing? I see straight through that agenda and I'm not falling for it at all.

    As for the Beyonce part about little support to social activism, one of the Ferguson protesters said that her and Jay have a special account where they bail out hundreds of protesters and have over the years helped significantly with supporting protests and such. I guess the reason we don't hear about it is because they're both notoriously private, especially with their private funds (as should everyone) and rarely use social media beyond Instagram. Both have however incorporated the idea of racial inequality into their music so I guess it's an argument of whether that's enough in this modern age. Has she ever been to a protest? Maybe not, but then again all Taylor did was take advantage of the recent protests by tweeting some empty praise. Why does gross opportunism make her some kind of feminist icon? Where was she when the US was being torn in two during the elections and a rampant psychopath and misogynist was taking over the country? Perhaps we wouldn't even be having these protests had she stood up and declared her political allegiance during the election and educated her country following on the dangers he was bringing. And her donation to Kesha was just a tacky PR move and a further example of her blatant opportunism. That donation only came when the media exposure to the case reached its peak. Where was her support during the other year long history of the case?

    In regards to the whole Casey v Remy argument, I think we have to look at the context of why they're being put on their respective pedestal. Remy is the first artist in a while to come at Nicki with such ferociousness and I think that made people realise that Nicki isn't this untouchable object we make her out to be which led to all the media hype. The same would probably happen if any artist of Remy's notoriety were to come at her with such a charged diss. And whilst Remy was found guilty of her crimes (committed 9 years ago)- which are disgusting and in my opinion do deserve further consideration from the media- she has served the time and paid for it. On the other side of the coin Casey Affleck's accusations are still ongoing and are very recent. However the fact is is that Affleck has yet to be convicted of his accusations, and it's unlikely that he ever will without solid evidence. Until he's convicted of his crimes he shouldn't be vilified by the media so I guess I do agree with you on that. I guess it's a similar situation to the whole Kesha v Dr Luke scenario, whilst I love Kesha a lot and wish the best for her it hit a point where I no longer felt I could take a side because the whole thing is so up in the air. It's a moral situation which I'm struggling with because whilst I wish I could hate Luke there still isn't a single piece of concrete evidence beyond some emails which we really don't know much about.

    This isn't an attack on you and you shouldn't view it as one, we should be encouraging discourse about social issues so it's interesting to hear your thoughts, but here are mine.

    Slay at you for actually responding unlike the illiterate unopionated @Baby V Alex! :hail: This is a lot to respond to tho so I'm gonna do it in dot points:

    • The entire article is about race and gender so I don't see why it's a bad thing if it's "racially motivated"? I was trying to explore why certain celebrities are villified while others and their transgressions go undiscussed. If anything I can agree that maybe it has more to do with gender than it does with race (i.e. Eminem being criticised for his lyrics about violence against women while Lana's lyrics go unnoticed), but I don't think it's untrue that black people (especially rappers) get "street cred" when they commit acts of violence (i.e., Tupac, Biggie, etc.) while white celebrities are often derided much more minor things than that (like that Fashion Police woman saying Zendaya smelt like patrouli oil).
    • The Moonlight point was to reflect the culture of outrage that exists in the media at the moment, but only as it's targetted towards white people. I actually wasn't talking about the merits of each movie as we both know they're completely subjective, but about media reactions to each. I guarantee you that if it had been a white person directing or starring in that film it would have been called a cultural appropriation, a white saviour narrative or would have been related to white people being obsessed with black tragedy. I won't debate with you too much about Moonlight because it's clear that you enjoyed it while I didn't find it particularly interesting at all. Weirdly, I actually found La La Land with all it's references a lot less redundant than Moonlight which just played out like yet another Precious narrative to me, with the addition of homosexuality. It was definitely brave for the writers to work autobiographically and the acting was good, but the movie itself was average to me.
    • I'm not going to believe the words of an unsourced "Ferguson protester" given that half of Beyonce's fans seem to think she created the universe. I disagree with your characterisation of her as "notoriously private" as it seems to me she takes any opportunity given to make some sensationalist Instagram post. And as far as I know she hasn't explicitly said anything about racial inequality in her music other than "okay ladies, now let's get in formation"? Willing to be proved wrong on that one tho. I could go on and counter your points about Taylor as well, but I actually don't care enough about her to bother. :stretcher: Again tho, we're debating specifics when I'm talking more about the media representation of each woman. You can't tell me that if Beyonce had donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to Kesha in a public way the media wouldn't have been all over it praising her.
    • Remy has very little notoriety tho...the only reason she's famous is because she attempted to kill someone and had a #27 collaborative hit with someone called Fat Joe. Unless you're again talking about her underground "street cred" but let's not pretend the charts or media care about what's happening in the Brooklyn rap scene.
    • Casey Affleck's accusations are neither recent or ongoing. They happened seven years ago (almost as long ago as Remy's) and were settled out of court shortly after, which to me closes the case. The only reason they were brought back up again was because he was a hot topic and certain websites thought it would be good clickbait.

    I agree with your sentiment at the end and thank you for your thoughts! :phone: The reason I get annoyed making posts like this is because certain people just blindly dislike them but don't actually give reasons as to why they think I'm incorrect. @Hawks has made negative posts on around four of my articles now saying things like "Countess...sis...this is a mes......." but when I actually ask them why they dislike it they have nothing to give. Thanks for your interesting points! <3

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    10 hours ago, Countess said:

    Slay at you for actually responding unlike the illiterate unopionated @Baby V Alex! :hail: This is a lot to respond to tho so I'm gonna do it in dot points:

    • The entire article is about race and gender so I don't see why it's a bad thing if it's "racially motivated"? I was trying to explore why certain celebrities are villified while others and their transgressions go undiscussed. If anything I can agree that maybe it has more to do with gender than it does with race (i.e. Eminem being criticised for his lyrics about violence against women while Lana's lyrics go unnoticed), but I don't think it's untrue that black people (especially rappers) get "street cred" when they commit acts of violence (i.e., Tupac, Biggie, etc.) while white celebrities are often derided much more minor things than that (like that Fashion Police woman saying Zendaya smelt like patrouli oil).
    • The Moonlight point was to reflect the culture of outrage that exists in the media at the moment, but only as it's targetted towards white people. I actually wasn't talking about the merits of each movie as we both know they're completely subjective, but about media reactions to each. I guarantee you that if it had been a white person directing or starring in that film it would have been called a cultural appropriation, a white saviour narrative or would have been related to white people being obsessed with black tragedy. I won't debate with you too much about Moonlight because it's clear that you enjoyed it while I didn't find it particularly interesting at all. Weirdly, I actually found La La Land with all it's references a lot less redundant than Moonlight which just played out like yet another Precious narrative to me, with the addition of homosexuality. It was definitely brave for the writers to work autobiographically and the acting was good, but the movie itself was average to me.
    • I'm not going to believe the words of an unsourced "Ferguson protester" given that half of Beyonce's fans seem to think she created the universe. I disagree with your characterisation of her as "notoriously private" as it seems to me she takes any opportunity given to make some sensationalist Instagram post. And as far as I know she hasn't explicitly said anything about racial inequality in her music other than "okay ladies, now let's get in formation"? Willing to be proved wrong on that one tho. I could go on and counter your points about Taylor as well, but I actually don't care enough about her to bother. :stretcher: Again tho, we're debating specifics when I'm talking more about the media representation of each woman. You can't tell me that if Beyonce had donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to Kesha in a public way the media wouldn't have been all over it praising her.
    • Remy has very little notoriety tho...the only reason she's famous is because she attempted to kill someone and had a #27 collaborative hit with someone called Fat Joe. Unless you're again talking about her underground "street cred" but let's not pretend the charts or media care about what's happening in the Brooklyn rap scene.
    • Casey Affleck's accusations are neither recent or ongoing. They happened seven years ago (almost as long ago as Remy's) and were settled out of court shortly after, which to me closes the case. The only reason they were brought back up again was because he was a hot topic and certain websites thought it would be good clickbait.

    I agree with your sentiment at the end and thank you for your thoughts! :phone: The reason I get annoyed making posts like this is because certain people just blindly dislike them but don't actually give reasons as to why they think I'm incorrect. @Hawks has made negative posts on around four of my articles now saying things like "Countess...sis...this is a mes......." but when I actually ask them why they dislike it they have nothing to give. Thanks for your interesting points! <3

    Found the Bey source, it was someone that wrote Jay's memoirs and is also an "award winning filmmaker" but I'm too tired to check out what exactly that's referring to :cackle: 

     IMG_4584_opt_noi5vm.png IMG_4585_opt_noi5w9.pngIMG_4586_opt_noi5wp.pngIMG_4587_opt_noi5xc.png

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/may/18/jay-z-beyonce-baltimore-ferguson-protests-bail-money

    http://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/19/entertainment/feat-jay-z-protesters-bail/

    http://www.dazeddigital.com/music/article/24779/1/jay-z-beyonce-baltimore-ferguson-protest-money-bail-police

    https://i-d.vice.com/en_gb/article/did-jay-z-and-beyonc-bail-out-protesters-in-baltimore

    http://uk.complex.com/music/2015/05/dream-hampton-talks-ferguson-baltimore-protests-jay-z

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/mbvd/jay-z-and-beyonce-paid-tens-of-thousands-to-bail-out-protest?utm_term=.cne59qljm#.sh3Oyeblm

     

    And I would've replied sooner, in fact most of my reply was already typed up but it's been a mad few days in terms of client work and meetings so I didn't have a chance to :fishie: 

    And I didn't actually know about Casey's allegations being from 2010, I must've skimmed over that when I read the initial articles about the Oscars, that changes everything in that case. There's been roughly the same time between incidents and yet one is clearly less severe than the other yet is widely more talked about. But whether or not we can put that down to just race is questionable, I'm sure there are other significant factors coming into play in this scenario.

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    13 hours ago, Hawks said:

    Wait, who, me? When did I wrote anything bad about your articles? @Countess :stretcher: 

    :shocked: NEVER. EVEN. MIND. I take that back. I think it was someone who had an avatar with a similiar photo to yours in it, it was late when I responded to this and I didn't even realise I was talking to you. :flush: I apologise!

    9 hours ago, Woodcrest said:

     

    Found the Bey source, it was someone that wrote Jay's memoirs and is also an "award winning filmmaker" but I'm too tired to check out what exactly that's referring to :cackle: 

     IMG_4584_opt_noi5vm.png IMG_4585_opt_noi5w9.pngIMG_4586_opt_noi5wp.pngIMG_4587_opt_noi5xc.png

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/may/18/jay-z-beyonce-baltimore-ferguson-protests-bail-money

    http://edition.cnn.com/2015/05/19/entertainment/feat-jay-z-protesters-bail/

    http://www.dazeddigital.com/music/article/24779/1/jay-z-beyonce-baltimore-ferguson-protest-money-bail-police

    https://i-d.vice.com/en_gb/article/did-jay-z-and-beyonc-bail-out-protesters-in-baltimore

    http://uk.complex.com/music/2015/05/dream-hampton-talks-ferguson-baltimore-protests-jay-z

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/mbvd/jay-z-and-beyonce-paid-tens-of-thousands-to-bail-out-protest?utm_term=.cne59qljm#.sh3Oyeblm

     

    And I would've replied sooner, in fact most of my reply was already typed up but it's been a mad few days in terms of client work and meetings so I didn't have a chance to :fishie: 

    And I didn't actually know about Casey's allegations being from 2010, I must've skimmed over that when I read the initial articles about the Oscars, that changes everything in that case. There's been roughly the same time between incidents and yet one is clearly less severe than the other yet is widely more talked about. But whether or not we can put that down to just race is questionable, I'm sure there are other significant factors coming into play in this scenario.

    Hmm...I'm loathe to believe anything I read on Twitter (remember when we thought there was that R8 insider spilling tea on the album delay before he started talking about how Rihanna was his secret wife and they'd been married for years?) but this does seem kinda legit I guess. I just looked up dream hampton and she seems to be pretty close to Jay so I can believe it.

    I think you're right about other factors coming into play. Like you said, in the publics eye Remy has "atoned" for her misdeeds already whereas maybe people feel Casey has only bought his way out of the situation? But either way, I stand by the idea that race and gender play a big part in how people are perceiving it. I just can't imagine a white male singer - Justin Bieber for example - shooting someone in the chest without having that ruin his career.

    Also, congrats on being so busy at work, I'm proud of you! <3 

    • YAAASSS 2

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